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     Diana: Death of a Princess

 

 

Below is an article from issue 22 (Autumn 1997) of Common Sense on the topic of Death of a Princess.

Diana: Death of a Princess

Whilst the elaborate funeral arrangements calmed the unprecedented public response to Princess Diana's sudden death - a mixture of shock, sense of loss and rage at the establishment - they also ensured that the actual happenings on that late evening in Paris were not discussed further. Many ordinary people in Britain openly question the tragic accident version, but only the foreign media dared to make mention of other possibilities. Other European media reported conspiracy theories floating about the internet and dismissed them as irrelevant. Non-European media in many cases talked openly of a plot to get rid of the princess who had become an embarrassment. Whilst proof is hard to come by, with witnesses taken care of by the highest authorities, too many pieces of information do not add up, and it is certainly not difficult to detect a motive. It must certainly have been a most unhappy time for the Royal Family and the British establishment to hear of Diana's intention to seriously get involved with an Arab, whose father had not long ago been denied British citizenship. That she gifted Dodi al-Fayed her late father's cuff links should indicate that the relationship meant more to Diana than a temporary acquaintance. One could hardly imagine the heirs to the throne, princes William and Harry looking up to and possibly living with a, at least nominally, Muslim step-father.

The scenario had arisen once before, when Princess Diana had not yet been divorced, but had a friendship with a Pakistani heart surgeon, Hasnat Khan. The Muslim News revealed that based on that relationship a novel had been written by an ex-SAS man, Barry Davies, telling the story of how right-wing extremists were plotting to kill Diana for bringing the country into disrepute by marrying a Muslim, who in the book Royal Blood is named as a Dr. Khan. The book was due to be published by Virgin later this year, but has now been withdrawn. A further motive was provided by her upsetting many powerful people with her campaign against land-mines, and it is said that she was going to turn attention next to the plight of Iraqi children dying by the thousands due to UN-sanctions.

The unanswered questions remain: Why were security arrangements changed on very short notice with the princess and her lover departing in a single limousine instead of being accorded the usual protection with three cars. Did the recent repairs to the car's steering wheel, after alleged vandalism, have anything to do with it getting out of control. In the early stages there were reports of the speedometer being stuck at a certain high speed, those reports were later retracted. People near the tunnel heard a loud, explosion-like sound. Photographers who tried to assist the princess were stopped from doing so by police. Photographers who arrived late at the scene were still arrested, maybe to make sure that they wouldn't divulge what they had witnessed. As there were allegedly so many photographers, there must be ample film footage of what really happened. None of the material has ever been released, and no release of material has been demanded, probably due to the hyped outrage against photographers who were made the scape-goat. According to some French papers there was another car travelling in front of the Mercedes trying to force it to brake just before it entered the tunnel. There were later reports that parts of another car that might have collided with the Mercedes were found at the crash site. None of these facts re-surfaced after they were first mentioned. Experts from Mercedes Benz had offered after the accident to assist with the crash analysis. There offer was rejected by French authorities.

Then there is the question of what happened to Diana after the accident, as apparently she sat on the floor of the car talking to a photographer, and she remained conscious during the two hours it took to cut her out of the wreckage, yet she was said to have suffered such severe injuries that necessitated the ambulance to drive so slowly that the 7-mile journey lasted a whole hour. However, when arriving at the hospital, her condition was not listed as critical. The condition was only recorded as critical four hours after the crash, and within ten minutes from then she is said to have died. The course of death given was cardiac tamponade, which means that there was severe pressure due to excess fluid in the vicinity of the heart, allegedly from a ruptured vein in the left lung, but this condition would not have permitted her to stay alive for four hours. Nor was she put onto a heart-lung machine during that time. Her body guard eventually survived, but cannot remember anything. It is quite likely that he would not survive the recovery of his memory at a later time. Seeing that the full facts around the death of J. F. Kennedy are still speculation and the cover-up continues, we shall have to wait for a long time to get answers to those questions.

Author: Islamic Party of Britain
Date Published: Autumn1997

 

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